Wednesday, February 08, 2006

Betsy_Ch.4_Zimmerman_I

Zimmerman says, "It's important to note that the "story" of the Ms. Pac-Man game-story certainly does not provide the same pleasures of a novel or film. But why should we expect it to? The question is, what pleasures can it provide that books or films cannot?"

Here is my attempt to answer:

Playing a Ms. Pac-Man game is very simple, I would think many people know the story of Ms. Pac-Man and what you have to do to survive, eat the yellow things and stay away from the ghosts. It's not as deep or as rich in a plot line such as a novel or a film. However Ms. Pac-Man adds a dimension, sort of like Mystery Science Theater 3000, in which you can add your own comments. You can laugh, yell, make fun of, talk, or not talk. You can do all these other actions that you cannot do in a movie theater or with reading a novel.

If someone has not read the novel you are reading, then any reactions will fall on deaf ears. Yet with Ms. Pac-Man you can 'play' and exagurate dying by a ghost and really get emotional with the game. So in summary, I think they pleasures it provides that books and films cannot is the emotional exprience that can be shared quickly with many.

6 Comments:

At 5:46 PM, Blogger Nick Geidner said...

I agree completely. I think films, books, and video games are all trying to do different things and ellicit different responses. I mean, when reading a book...i've never though wow this chapter is really out of focus. But in a movie an out of focus shot can ellicit specific feelings and emotions. But what do I know?

 
At 7:20 PM, Blogger Yildiz said...

I hope I have understood the post well. The question that you are answering is-- that we get emotional pleasures when playing Ms.Pac-man than from movies and novels?

but then why don't i cry when my pacman dies? I mean you would get frustrated but emotional..hmm.
bcoz i cried in Schindler's list.. that would mean i was emotionally moved.

the pleasure that I can see from playing Ms.Pac-man is a certain degree of controlling Pacman..you steer and the outcomes is the resultant of your ability to escape those ghosts. Yes you do become attached.. but not emotionally.. bcoz when it dies.. I know I have two more lives:D ehehe

to get emotional i guess.. I need more time with Pacman.. so that the attachment turns into deep emotional relationship
(like Michelle has with her character in War of Warcraft)

 
At 10:53 PM, Blogger Donggeol said...

That absolutely depends on how differently each person accepts things emotionaly or logicaly.

I guess that's the reason that we are arguing about now.
We response whatever narrative a game provides us and build our own narratives based on our own responses. Then again we get emotional or frustrated by the narratives.

* Don't even know what I'm talking about. VERY CONFUSED BY MYSELF.

 
At 8:37 AM, Blogger RAFAEL BRIONES RODRIGUEZ said...

I ALSO SHARE UR VIEWS GUYS, I THINK THE
EMOTIONAL LEVEL FLUCTUATES BETWEEN THE ATTACHMENT WE HAVE WITH THE GAME WE
ARE PLAYING. I REMEMBER PLAYING THE
OLYMPICS DURING THE EARLY 80'S, I USED TO
GET MAD BY NOT FINISHING THE GAME, BUT
U GET SO MUCH INTO THAT GAME THAT THE ATTACHMENT TO THIS GAME IS IN THE PHYSICAL ASPECT.

 
At 1:43 PM, Blogger Ashley Ward said...

I think the emotional responses come from different places. In a videogame, I am Mrs. PacMan. I'm frustrated and upset because it's me out there. But in books or movies, I can identify with certain struggles and understand thier plight. Because I can identify with them, I can feel emotional about them.

 
At 3:21 PM, Blogger BP said...

As media technology progresses, the use of imagination in the media is becoming less and less prevalent. It seems as though everything is being spoon-fed to us. If a producer wants us to feel a certain way, they will add an element to the interactivity to feel that way. I suppose that's a part of the technology that we have to sacrifice to progress with it.

 

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